BONUS EPISODE

The Gangster's Daughter

Nicole and Gerard Ouimette in a limousine on their way to a father-daughter dance at Nicole's high school. In his memoir, Gerard wrote that when they arrived, they got out as if they "were stepping onto the red carpet at the Academy Awards, and I escorted her in as if she was a movie star." Courtesy of Gerard Ouimette.

Nicole and Gerard Ouimette in a limousine on their way to a father-daughter dance at Nicole's high school. In his memoir, Gerard wrote that when they arrived, they got out as if they "were stepping onto the red carpet at the Academy Awards, and I escorted her in as if she was a movie star." Courtesy of Gerard Ouimette.

Nicole Ouimette always knew her father was different. He was in and out of prison for most of her childhood. He had a lot of money but no job. And then, one night, the FBI showed up.

More on this episode from the Providence Journal →

LISTEN TO THE GANGSTER'S DAUGHTER


DAD'S IN THE MOB

Gerard Ouimette was involved in criminal activity from a young age. In 1958, just two months after turning 18, he was sentenced to six years in prison for the armed robbery of a jewelry store in South Providence. After that prison stay, he continued to get arrested on other gun charges. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Gerard Ouimette was involved in criminal activity from a young age. In 1958, just two months after turning 18, he was sentenced to six years in prison for the armed robbery of a jewelry store in South Providence. After that prison stay, he continued to get arrested on other gun charges. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

In the 1960s, Gerard Ouimette, far left, rose quickly in the ranks of the Patriarca crime family. Courtesy of Nicole Sousa.

In the 1960s, Gerard Ouimette, far left, rose quickly in the ranks of the Patriarca crime family. Courtesy of Nicole Sousa.

I would have never imagined that he would have taken people’s lives. Not my father.
— Nicole Sousa, Gerard Ouimette's Daughter
Ouimette, seated second from right, spent the 1970s in prison, but incarceration hardly slowed him down. He ran criminal enterprises from his cell, smuggled in alcohol, and enjoyed lavish dinners like the one pictured above. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Ouimette, seated second from right, spent the 1970s in prison, but incarceration hardly slowed him down. He ran criminal enterprises from his cell, smuggled in alcohol, and enjoyed lavish dinners like the one pictured above. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Gerard Ouimette holds his daughter Nicole while lawyer Jack Cicilline, the girl's godfather, looks on. Special to The Providence Journal/Tracy Breton.

Gerard Ouimette holds his daughter Nicole while lawyer Jack Cicilline, the girl's godfather, looks on. Special to The Providence Journal/Tracy Breton.


BACK BEHIND BARS

All I remember from that night is them barging in. It really sounded like the end of the world.
— Nicole Sousa

In 1994, less than five months after being paroled, Ouimette was arrested once again, this time on extortion charges. Courtesy of WPRI.

Flanked by federal marshals, Ouimette is returned to custody after his 1995 arraignment for extortion charges. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Flanked by federal marshals, Ouimette is returned to custody after his 1995 arraignment for extortion charges. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Ouimette is escorted out of Federal Court after being sentenced to life in prison without parole on February 1, 1996. Ouimette was known for his flashy outfits and lifestyle; retired state police captain Brian Andrews described him as the "Prince of Atwells Avenue." Courtesy of The Providence Journal/David Carson.

Ouimette is escorted out of Federal Court after being sentenced to life in prison without parole on February 1, 1996. Ouimette was known for his flashy outfits and lifestyle; retired state police captain Brian Andrews described him as the "Prince of Atwells Avenue." Courtesy of The Providence Journal/David Carson.

Ouimette became the first person in New England, and the fourth in the nation, to be sentenced to life without parole under the "three-strikes-and-you're-out" provision of the 1994 federal crime bill. Courtesy of the Providence Public Library/The Providence Journal.


What Price Providence?

Nicole's son, Nick, with Ouimette in the prison visiting room. Nick learned of his grandfather's criminal career in eighth grade, when he read What Price Providence?, Ouimette's memoir. Courtesy of Nicole Sousa.

Nicole's son, Nick, with Ouimette in the prison visiting room. Nick learned of his grandfather's criminal career in eighth grade, when he read What Price Providence?, Ouimette's memoir. Courtesy of Nicole Sousa.

I always had the feeling that he would come home.
— Nicole Sousa
After learning the grim details of her father's crimes from his memoir, Nicole told her kids about his life, as a cautionary tale. Courtesy of Nicole Sousa.

After learning the grim details of her father's crimes from his memoir, Nicole told her kids about his life, as a cautionary tale. Courtesy of Nicole Sousa.


DEATH on the inside

Courtesy of YouTube/WPRI.

If I would have known that was going to be my last conversation with him, I probably would have said more.
— Nicole Sousa

Episode Credits

Crimetown is Marc Smerling and Zac Stuart-Pontier. It is produced by Drew Nelles, Austin Mitchell, Kaitlin Roberts, and Mike Plunkett. The associate producer is Laura Sim. The show is edited by Alex Blumberg and Caitlin Kenney. Fact-checking by Mick Rouse. This episode of Crimetown was mixed, sound designed, and scored by Matthew Boll and Kenny Kusiak. The title track is “Run To Your Mama” by Goat. 

Original music by John Kusiak, Jon Ivans, Edwin, and Bienart. The ad music is by Matthew Boll. The show's digital editor is Rob Szypko. The design director is Ale Lariu. Archival research by Brennan Rees.This season of Crimetown is dedicated to the memory of Zachary Malinowski. Thanks to everybody who shared their stories with us. Providence is a special place, and we're honored to tell a part of its story.

Ale LariuBonus Episode 2