BONUS EPISODE

CAT AND MOUSE PART II

  The Emerald Square Mall in North Attleboro, Massachusetts in January 1990. Tony Fiore assembled a team to rob an armored Wells Fargo truck at the mall in 1991. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

 

The Emerald Square Mall in North Attleboro, Massachusetts in January 1990. Tony Fiore assembled a team to rob an armored Wells Fargo truck at the mall in 1991. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

When master burglar Tony Fiore gets out of prison, he decides to try something different: robbing armored cars at gunpoint. His new hobby will bring him head to head with an old adversary one last time.

More on this episode from The Providence Journal →

LISTEN TO CAT AND MOUSE PART II


The EMERALD SQUARE MALL HEIST

Tony Fiore in a 1975 mugshot. After Fiore was released from prison in 1989, he developed an appetite for robbing armored cars. 

Tony Fiore in a 1975 mugshot. After Fiore was released from prison in 1989, he developed an appetite for robbing armored cars. 

George, you’re gonna sit in the wheelchair with a blanket over your leg, with the AK-47 under the blanket.
— Tony Fiore
George Chapdelaine in a 1975 mugshot. In 1991, Chapdelaine posed as an elderly man in a wheelchair for Fiore's plot. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

George Chapdelaine in a 1975 mugshot. In 1991, Chapdelaine posed as an elderly man in a wheelchair for Fiore's plot. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

This surveillance photograph shows the four men who attempted the Emerald Square Mall robbery — Fiore, Chapdelaine, Edward Mahan, and George Whalen — exiting a restaurant in Walpole, Massachusetts. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

This surveillance photograph shows the four men who attempted the Emerald Square Mall robbery — Fiore, Chapdelaine, Edward Mahan, and George Whalen — exiting a restaurant in Walpole, Massachusetts. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.


Good Friday, Bad Timing

In 1990, Brian became the Detective Commander of the Rhode Island state police. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

In 1990, Brian became the Detective Commander of the Rhode Island state police. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

When you take down armored cars, it’s all in timing.
— State Police Detective Commander Brian Andrews
Andrews sports his captain's uniform in 1991. He retired shortly after the Emerald Square Mall case. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

Andrews sports his captain's uniform in 1991. He retired shortly after the Emerald Square Mall case. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

I’ve been on these guys for years. This was going to make your whole career for Christ’s sakes.
— State Police Investigator Jim Mullen
The Ann & Hope store and corporate headquarters in Cumberland, Rhode Island. Fiore and his crew used this parking lot as a staging area to get ready for the heist. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Kris Craig.

The Ann & Hope store and corporate headquarters in Cumberland, Rhode Island. Fiore and his crew used this parking lot as a staging area to get ready for the heist. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Kris Craig.

Police impounded the car George Chapdelaine used on the day of the attempted Emerald Square Mall robbery. Andrews is on the far right. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

Police impounded the car George Chapdelaine used on the day of the attempted Emerald Square Mall robbery. Andrews is on the far right. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

Tom Hughes of the FBI, far left, announces the Emerald Square Mall arrests at the Lincoln Woods state police barracks in 1991. Andrews is on the far right. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

Tom Hughes of the FBI, far left, announces the Emerald Square Mall arrests at the Lincoln Woods state police barracks in 1991. Andrews is on the far right. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.


Doing Time

Tony Fiore pleaded guilty to participating in the planned armored vehicle robbery, and would later serve about 17 years in prison. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Tony Fiore pleaded guilty to participating in the planned armored vehicle robbery, and would later serve about 17 years in prison. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Tony Fiore poses with New York City crime boss John A. "Junior" Gotti, left, in a federal prison yard. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Tony Fiore poses with New York City crime boss John A. "Junior" Gotti, left, in a federal prison yard. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

I lost everybody. My mother died, my father died, my brother died when I was in prison.
— Tony Fiore

Jesus Christ, I can’t believe we did that stuff.
— Brian Andrews, on his days as a state cop
Brian Andrews and Tony Fiore meet for dinner in September 2014. Today, the two old adversaries are on friendly terms. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

Brian Andrews and Tony Fiore meet for dinner in September 2014. Today, the two old adversaries are on friendly terms. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.


EPISODE CREDITS

Crimetown is Marc Smerling and Zac Stuart-Pontier. It is produced by Drew Nelles, Austin Mitchell, Kaitlin Roberts, and Mike Plunkett. The associate producer is Laura Sim. The show is edited by Alex Blumberg and Caitlin Kenney. Fact-checking by Mick Rouse. This episode of Crimetown was mixed, sound designed, and scored by Matthew Boll. The title track is “Run To Your Mama” by Goat. 

Original music by John Kusiak, Jon Ivans, Edwin, and Bienart. The ad music is by Matthew Boll. The show's digital editor is Rob Szypko. The design director is Ale Lariu. This season of Crimetown is dedicated to the memory of Zachary Malinowski. Thanks to everybody who shared their stories with us. Providence is a special place, and we're honored to tell a part of its story.

Ale LariuBonus Episode 1