CHAPTER ELEVEN

The Doctor Broad

Dr. Barbara Roberts, who attended to Raymond Patriarca, testifies in Superior Court. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/ William L. Rooney.

Dr. Barbara Roberts, who attended to Raymond Patriarca, testifies in Superior Court. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/ William L. Rooney.

A young doctor suddenly finds herself caring for a sickly old man named Raymond Patriarca. As she grows closer to her new patient, she’s drawn into the underworld in more ways than one.

More on this episode from The Providence Journal →

LISTEN TO CHAPTER ELEVEN


A Teenage Fugitive

Raymond Patriarca in a photo from the 1930s. After his father Eleuterio died in 1925, Patriarca quickly fell into a life of crime. "I lost my father, and I guess I drifted a little," he later said. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Raymond Patriarca in a photo from the 1930s. After his father Eleuterio died in 1925, Patriarca quickly fell into a life of crime. "I lost my father, and I guess I drifted a little," he later said. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Patriarca in 1941. That year, he began a three-year prison stay for a holdup sentence and other crimes. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Patriarca in 1941. That year, he began a three-year prison stay for a holdup sentence and other crimes. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

News clippings from the late 1920s offer a glimpse of Raymond Patriarca's early run-ins with the law, for crimes including hijacking a truck during a "rum-running war" and safe-breaking. In some instances, the teenage Patriarca used the alias John D'Nubile. Courtesy of the Providence Public Library.


The Boss Is Brought In

The golden apple was Raymond.
— Detective Vinny Vespia
Raymond Patriarca, 59, leaves federal court in Boston in 1968. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Raymond Patriarca, 59, leaves federal court in Boston in 1968. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Patriarca flicks his cigar at a reporter as he enters state prison in 1969. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Patriarca flicks his cigar at a reporter as he enters state prison in 1969. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

After finishing a three-year prison sentence in 1944, Patriarca went more than 20 years without an arrest. That stretch ended in the late 1960s. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

After finishing a three-year prison sentence in 1944, Patriarca went more than 20 years without an arrest. That stretch ended in the late 1960s. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Patriarca walks along a Providence street in the mid-1970s. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Patriarca walks along a Providence street in the mid-1970s. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.


He seems to get ill every time there is an indictment about to issue against him.
— District Attorney Ronald Pena
Raymond Patriarca's defense attorney Jack Cicilline in his office in 1983. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Lawrence S. Millard.

Raymond Patriarca's defense attorney Jack Cicilline in his office in 1983. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Lawrence S. Millard.

Patriarca, strapped to a stretcher and attached to a portable heart monitor, pleads innocent through his attorney, Cicilline, who said Patriarca's condition was so serious that "he might die at any moment." Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Patriarca, strapped to a stretcher and attached to a portable heart monitor, pleads innocent through his attorney, Cicilline, who said Patriarca's condition was so serious that "he might die at any moment." Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Raymond Patriarca leaves court with his defense lawyer, Jack Cicilline, in the early 1980s. Courtesy of The Providence Journal. 

Raymond Patriarca leaves court with his defense lawyer, Jack Cicilline, in the early 1980s. Courtesy of The Providence Journal. 

While staying at Miriam Hospital for an "erratic heartbeat," Patriarca was charged by Massachusetts authorities in relation to the 1968 execution of Robert Candos. Patriarca was taken by ambulance from the hospital to Superior Court for his arraignment. Courtesy of Tim White, WPRI Channel 12.


From Radical Doctor to Mob Daughter

Barbara Roberts speaking at the last mass demonstration against the Vietnam War, on the grounds of the Washington Monument in 1973. Courtesy of Dr. Barbara Roberts.

Barbara Roberts speaking at the last mass demonstration against the Vietnam War, on the grounds of the Washington Monument in 1973. Courtesy of Dr. Barbara Roberts.

I always wanted to stand up for the underdog. And in this situation, Raymond was the underdog.
— Dr. Barbara Roberts
  A pale Raymond Patriarca, swathed in sheets and carried on a stretcher, is accompanied by Dr. Barbara Roberts and other medical personnel at his arraignment in March 1981. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

 

A pale Raymond Patriarca, swathed in sheets and carried on a stretcher, is accompanied by Dr. Barbara Roberts and other medical personnel at his arraignment in March 1981. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Dr. Roberts performs a cardiac catheterization. She was the first female cardiologist in Rhode Island, and is also the author of The Truth About Statins. Courtesy of Dr. Barbara Roberts.

Dr. Roberts performs a cardiac catheterization. She was the first female cardiologist in Rhode Island, and is also the author of The Truth About Statins. Courtesy of Dr. Barbara Roberts.

Dr. Roberts outside her office in Providence in 2012. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Bob Thayer.

Dr. Roberts outside her office in Providence in 2012. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Bob Thayer.


A Match Made at The Forum

These passport-type photos of the many faces of Luigi "Louis" Manocchio were discovered in a mob safehouse in New York City in 1972, while he was a fugitive. Providence Police Department photo, courtesy of The Providence Journal.

These passport-type photos of the many faces of Luigi "Louis" Manocchio were discovered in a mob safehouse in New York City in 1972, while he was a fugitive. Providence Police Department photo, courtesy of The Providence Journal.

From left: Dr. Roberts's daughter Dory, Manocchio and Roberts at a wedding in 1982. Courtesy of Dr. Barbara Roberts.

From left: Dr. Roberts's daughter Dory, Manocchio and Roberts at a wedding in 1982. Courtesy of Dr. Barbara Roberts.

Louis Manocchio in a July 13, 1979 mug shot. Providence Police Department photo, courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Louis Manocchio in a July 13, 1979 mug shot. Providence Police Department photo, courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Manocchio with Roberts' daughter, Meg, in 1994. Courtesy of Dr. Barbara Roberts.

Manocchio with Roberts' daughter, Meg, in 1994. Courtesy of Dr. Barbara Roberts.


If it came out that I was not only now the mob doctor, but a mob mistress, it would make my testimony about Raymond’s health almost worthless.
— Dr. Barbara Roberts
Rudolph Marfeo, gunned down in 1968 with Anthony Melei at Pannone's Market, on Pocasset Avenue. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Rudolph Marfeo, gunned down in 1968 with Anthony Melei at Pannone's Market, on Pocasset Avenue. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Manocchio listens to his attorney, Martin K. Leppo, before his sentencing in 1983. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Manocchio listens to his attorney, Martin K. Leppo, before his sentencing in 1983. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Manocchio is escorted from Superior Court in Providence, where he was found guilty on several counts in connection with the 1968 gangland slaying of Rudolph Marfeo and Anthony Melei. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Richard Benjamin.

Manocchio is escorted from Superior Court in Providence, where he was found guilty on several counts in connection with the 1968 gangland slaying of Rudolph Marfeo and Anthony Melei. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Richard Benjamin.

Manocchio listens to motions in Judge Joseph Rodgers's court during a pre-trial hearing in 1999, for a felony charge for receiving stolen goods in 1994. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy.

Manocchio listens to motions in Judge Joseph Rodgers's court during a pre-trial hearing in 1999, for a felony charge for receiving stolen goods in 1994. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy.


The End of an Era

Berarducci & Sons Funeral Home on Broadway in Providence. Courtesy of The Providence Journal. 

Berarducci & Sons Funeral Home on Broadway in Providence. Courtesy of The Providence Journal. 

Friends and relatives of the late Raymond Patriarca gather at the entrance to the Patriarca family mausoleum at the Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Friends and relatives of the late Raymond Patriarca gather at the entrance to the Patriarca family mausoleum at the Gate of Heaven Cemetery. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Rita O'Toole Patriarca, wife of Raymond Patriarca, leaves the Berarducci & Sons Funeral Home en route to the Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Providence, where her husband was buried. AP file photo, courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Rita O'Toole Patriarca, wife of Raymond Patriarca, leaves the Berarducci & Sons Funeral Home en route to the Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Providence, where her husband was buried. AP file photo, courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Hundreds of onlookers waited for an hour or more to catch a glimpse of Patriarca's funeral procession. FBI agents, state police, and Providence detectives were also in attendance, recording license plate numbers and taking photographs. Courtesy of Tim White, WPRI Channel 12.
 

The Patriarca family crypt at the Gate of Heaven Cemetery, where Raymond Patriarca is now buried. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy.

The Patriarca family crypt at the Gate of Heaven Cemetery, where Raymond Patriarca is now buried. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy.


Newspaper coverage at the time of Patriarca's declining health and death catalogued the rise of his crime empire, his impact on Federal Hill, and the power vacuum he left behind.

Thursday, July 12, 1984

Sunday, July 15, 1984

Sunday, July 15, 1984

Sunday, January 18, 1981


Episode Credits

Crimetown is Marc Smerling and Zac Stuart-Pontier. It is produced by Drew Nelles, Kaitlin Roberts, Austin Mitchell, and Mike Plunkett. The associate producer is Laura Sim. The show is edited by Alex Blumberg and Caitlin Kenney. Fact-checking by Mick Rouse. This episode of Crimetown was mixed, sound designed, and scored by Haley Shaw. Additional mixing by Matthew Boll, Martin Peralta and Enoch Kim. Additional sound design by Robin Shore at Silver Sound. Casting by Shelly Shenoy. Featuring performances by Shelly Shenoy, Brian Silliman, Tarcisio Longobardi, and introducing Piper Yang. Archival footage courtesy of Rhode Island’s WPRI Channel 12 and WJAR Channel 10. The title track is “Run To Your Mama” by Goat.

"Torna A. Surriento" is written by Ernesto de Curtis and G.B. Curtis, and is performed by Joshua Bell, Sarah Bell and Mark Armstrong, courtesy of Jonathan D. Raben from the soundtrack to his documentary Italian Americans and Federal Hill. Original music by John Kusiak, Kenny Kusiak, Jon Ivans, Edwin and Bienart. Ad music is by Matthew Boll. The show's digital editor is Rob Szypko. The design director is Ale Lariu. Archival research by Brennan Rees.This season of Crimetown is dedicated to the memory of Zachary Malinowski. Thanks to the Providence Journal, Providence Public Library, Julia Heymans, Emily Wiedemann, Kate Wells, Lisa Newby, Tim White, Mary Murphy, and everyone who shared their stories with us. Providence is a special place, and we're honored to tell a part of its story.

 

Ale LariuEpisode Eleven