BONUS EPISODE

Courtney

Courtney Calenda holds her Yorkshire Terrier, Oliver. The dog was a gift from lawyer Joseph Bevilacqua Jr. Calenda accused Bevilacqua of introducing her to cocaine and engaging in a sexual relationship that began when she was 17 and he was 53. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Bill Murphy.

Courtney Calenda holds her Yorkshire Terrier, Oliver. The dog was a gift from lawyer Joseph Bevilacqua Jr. Calenda accused Bevilacqua of introducing her to cocaine and engaging in a sexual relationship that began when she was 17 and he was 53. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Bill Murphy.

Courtney Calenda is a star high school student — until a powerful attorney more than three times her age pulls her into a downward spiral of sex and drugs. As her life falls apart, she decides to fight back.

LISTEN TO COURTNEY


A STAR STUDENT AND MR. BEV

Courtney Calenda, right, was one of two freshmen students to make the varsity soccer team at East Greenwich High School. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Ruben W. Perez.

Courtney Calenda, right, was one of two freshmen students to make the varsity soccer team at East Greenwich High School. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Ruben W. Perez.

Bevilacqua, left, in court defending alleged cocaine dealer Gerald C. Greaves in 2004. In Providence, Bevilacqua was known as a high-profile and influential defense attorney. Friends called him "Mr. Bev." Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Bevilacqua, left, in court defending alleged cocaine dealer Gerald C. Greaves in 2004. In Providence, Bevilacqua was known as a high-profile and influential defense attorney. Friends called him "Mr. Bev." Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Joseph Bevilacqua Jr., left, in 1986 with his father, Joseph Bevilacqua Sr., who was the Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court at the time. Following reports of Joseph Sr.'s close relationships with members of organized crime, the Rhode Island legislature initiated impeachment hearings against him. Joseph Jr. was on his father's defense team. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Rachel Ritchie.

Joseph Bevilacqua Jr., left, in 1986 with his father, Joseph Bevilacqua Sr., who was the Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court at the time. Following reports of Joseph Sr.'s close relationships with members of organized crime, the Rhode Island legislature initiated impeachment hearings against him. Joseph Jr. was on his father's defense team. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Rachel Ritchie.

He told me he was invincible. He told me that he basically can do anything he wants.
— Courtney Calenda
Bevilacqua worked with defense attorney Richard M. Egbert, right, during his father's impeachment hearings. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Bevilacqua worked with defense attorney Richard M. Egbert, right, during his father's impeachment hearings. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.


THE CALENDAS GO PUBLIC

We just threw it all out there and it was explosive.
— Courtney Calenda

On Father's Day of 2005, the Providence Journal published a lengthy article detailing the Calenda family's allegations against Bevilacqua. The report drew heavily from a complaint the Calendas had filed with the disciplinary board of the Rhode Island Supreme Court. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.


A LAWYER GOES TO PRISON

Bevilacqua, right, leaves U.S. District Court with his client Joseph Pannone in 2000. Pannone, who had been a city tax assessor, pleaded guilty to money-laundering and corruption charges in the Plunder Dome case, which also took down former mayor Buddy Cianci. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy.

Bevilacqua, right, leaves U.S. District Court with his client Joseph Pannone in 2000. Pannone, who had been a city tax assessor, pleaded guilty to money-laundering and corruption charges in the Plunder Dome case, which also took down former mayor Buddy Cianci. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy.

Bevilacqua was arrested on domestic disorderly charges in 2003. According to the police report, his wife Donna accused him of throwing chairs and a plant at her during an argument that started when she complained about his visits to "gentlemen's clubs." The charges were later dismissed. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

Bevilacqua was arrested on domestic disorderly charges in 2003. According to the police report, his wife Donna accused him of throwing chairs and a plant at her during an argument that started when she complained about his visits to "gentlemen's clubs." The charges were later dismissed. Courtesy of The Providence Journal.

It was such an eye-opener, to understand that this was a pattern of a lifetime of behavior.
— Courtney Calenda
Bevilacqua was found guilty of criminal contempt and perjury for leaking FBI recordings to a reporter during the Plunder Dome trial. Above, Bevilacqua arrives at U.S. District Court in Providence. He was sentenced to 18 months in prison. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy.

Bevilacqua was found guilty of criminal contempt and perjury for leaking FBI recordings to a reporter during the Plunder Dome trial. Above, Bevilacqua arrives at U.S. District Court in Providence. He was sentenced to 18 months in prison. Courtesy of The Providence Journal/Mary Murphy.


CREDITS

Crimetown is Marc Smerling and Zac Stuart-Pontier, in partnership with Gimlet Media. This episode was produced by Austin Mitchell and Rob Szypko. The senior producer is Drew Nelles. Editing this week by John White, Soraya Shockley, Caitlin Kenney and Sruthi Pinnamaneni. Fact-checking by Max Thorn. This episode of Crimetown was mixed, sound designed, and scored by Kenny Kusiak.

The title track is “Run To Your Mama” by Goat. The credit track for this episode is “Backwards” by Alice Cohen. Original music by John Kusiak, Kenny Kusiak, Edwin and Bienart. Ad music is by Matthew Boll. Archival footage courtesy of WPRI Channel 12. Thanks to the Calenda Family, Julia Heymans, Emily Wiedemann, Tim White, The Providence Journal, Lisa Newby, and Brennan Rees, and everybody else who shared their stories with us.