CHAPTER EIGHT

Cat and Mouse

The Rhode Island state police spent years tracking Tony Fiore. The technology they used marked a turning point for law enforcement. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

The Rhode Island state police spent years tracking Tony Fiore. The technology they used marked a turning point for law enforcement. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

A master thief keeps getting away with big heists. A cop spends years tailing him, tapping his phone, and practically moving in across the street. Their epic tug-of-war will revolutionize the fight against organized crime.

More on this episode from the Providence Journal →

Listen to Chapter EIGHT


Brian Andrews fought for the Marine Corps in Vietnam. Pictured here in 1967, he poses with a defused booby trap at the U.S. military base of Chu Lai. Courtesy of Brian Andrews. 

Brian Andrews fought for the Marine Corps in Vietnam. Pictured here in 1967, he poses with a defused booby trap at the U.S. military base of Chu Lai. Courtesy of Brian Andrews

As a state police detective, Brian worked closely with the FBI to track the movements of Tony Fiore and his crew. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.  

As a state police detective, Brian worked closely with the FBI to track the movements of Tony Fiore and his crew. Courtesy of Brian Andrews 

Brian's police identification card from the early 1970s, when he first joined the force as a state trooper. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

Brian's police identification card from the early 1970s, when he first joined the force as a state trooper. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.


There was only one crew that could pull off these major jobs, and that was Tony Fiore and his guys.
— Brian Andrews

One of Tony’s most spectacular robberies was knocking off a precious metals refinery called Pease and Curren. Above, the ovens at Pease and Curren, where workers melt down gold and other precious metals. Courtesy of the Providence Journal/Mary Murphy.

One of Tony’s most spectacular robberies was knocking off a precious metals refinery called Pease and Curren. Above, the ovens at Pease and Curren, where workers melt down gold and other precious metals. Courtesy of the Providence Journal/Mary Murphy.

Pease and Curren, located in Warwick, Rhode Island, is still in business. When Tony robbed the refinery in the 1970s, he said the gold bars were so heavy that the tires of his getaway car were almost flat. Courtesy of the Providence Journal/Mary Murphy.

Pease and Curren, located in Warwick, Rhode Island, is still in business. When Tony robbed the refinery in the 1970s, he said the gold bars were so heavy that the tires of his getaway car were almost flat. Courtesy of the Providence Journal/Mary Murphy.


A news story detailing Tony Fiore's acquittal on robbery charges. It explains how Tony's sister, Elaine Darling, was originally picked to serve on the jury at his trial. Courtesy of the Providence Journal.

A news story detailing Tony Fiore's acquittal on robbery charges. It explains how Tony's sister, Elaine Darling, was originally picked to serve on the jury at his trial. Courtesy of the Providence Journal.

They couldn’t convict me. I always caught a break with the young girls on juries.
— Tony Fiore
A young Tony Fiore. Courtesy of Tony Fiore.

A young Tony Fiore. Courtesy of Tony Fiore.



While devising a plan to break into Tony's home and plant hidden microphones, state police drew this map of the house. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

While devising a plan to break into Tony's home and plant hidden microphones, state police drew this map of the house. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

Brian, the state police and the FBI set up a surveillance command post on the second floor of a house that faced Tony's front door. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

Brian, the state police and the FBI set up a surveillance command post on the second floor of a house that faced Tony's front door. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.


Brian used a phony Rhode Island driver's license—including a fake last name and residence—while he was surveilling Tony's home. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

Brian used a phony Rhode Island driver's license—including a fake last name and residencewhile he was surveilling Tony's home. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.


Charles Kennedy, a member of Tony Fiore's crew, is pictured here in an FBI photo from 1978. Intelligence officials gave him the nickname "The Ghost" because he was notoriously difficult to catch. Courtesy of the Rhode Island state police.

Charles Kennedy, a member of Tony Fiore's crew, is pictured here in an FBI photo from 1978. Intelligence officials gave him the nickname "The Ghost" because he was notoriously difficult to catch. Courtesy of the Rhode Island state police.

Tony Fiore poses with New York City crime boss John A. "Junior" Gotti, left, in a federal prison yard. Courtesy of the Providence Journal.

Tony Fiore poses with New York City crime boss John A. "Junior" Gotti, left, in a federal prison yard. Courtesy of the Providence Journal.


A letter from FBI director William H. Webster congratulating Brian on the arrest of Tony Fiore. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

A letter from FBI director William H. Webster congratulating Brian on the arrest of Tony Fiore. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

In 1990, Brian became the Captain, Detective Commander of the Rhode Island state police. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

In 1990, Brian became the Captain, Detective Commander of the Rhode Island state police. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

 Brian sports his captain's uniform in 1991. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.

 Brian sports his captain's uniform in 1991. Courtesy of Brian Andrews.


From left to right: Charles Kennedy, Brian Andrews and Tony Fiore meet for dinner in September 2014, a few years after Tony is released from his 20-year prison sentence. Courtesy of Brian Andrews. 

From left to right: Charles Kennedy, Brian Andrews and Tony Fiore meet for dinner in September 2014, a few years after Tony is released from his 20-year prison sentence. Courtesy of Brian Andrews


Episode Credits

Additional mixing by Martin Peralta and Enoch Kim. Our digital editor is Kate Parkinson-Morgan. Our design director is Ale Lariu. This season of Crimetown is dedicated to the memory of Zachary Malinowski. Thanks to the Providence Journal, Julia Heymans, Emily Wiedemann, Lisa Newby, Mary Murphy and everyone who shared their stories with us. if you’re enjoying Crimetown, leave us a rating and review on iTunes. It really helps others find out about the show. Providence is a special place, and we're honored to tell a part of its story.

Crimetown is Marc Smerling and Zac Stuart-Pontier. It is produced by Drew Nelles, Austin Mitchell and Mike Plunkett, with additional production by Laura Sim. The show is edited by Alex Blumberg and Caitlin Kenney, with additional editing by Kaitlin Roberts. Fact-checking by Mick Rouse. This episode of Crimetown was mixed, sound designed and scored by Matthew Boll. Additional sound design by Ted Robinson at Silver Sound. Our title track is "Run to Your Mama" by Goat. Original music by John Kusiak, Jon Ivans, Edwin and Bienart. Our ad music is by Matthew Boll. 

Ale LariuEpisode Eight